Aston Martin, successful sports car manufacturer decided to enter open-wheels racing in the end of 1950s.  Technically, the DBR4 designed by Ted Cutting, was largely based on the DB3S sportscar  racer, but of course more tightly packaged to meet the single-seater requirements. The chassis was a straightforward spaceframe, suspended by wishbones and coil springs at the front and a DeDion axle at the rear. The DBR4 was the last new Grand Prix car to use the de Dion system. The engine was the familiar twin-cam straight six downsized to 2.5 litres. Breathing through three Weber carburetors, the engine produced as much as 280 bhp according to factory claims. The engine was mated to a David Brown five speed gearbox. Although it was tested as early as 1957, the DBR4 did not make its racing debut until the 1959. Before the 1959 season, Jack Brabham had agreed to drive for Aston Martin team, but fortunately for him he was picked up by Cooper and went on to score his first World Championship. This left the British team with their Le Mans winning drivers Carroll Shelby and Roy Salvadori to race the DBR4s. Salvadori made a promising debut at the 1959 BRDC International Trophy held on 2 May 1959 at Silverstone by finishing second behind Brabham in the Cooper. But then in the World Championship Grand Prix races overweight and underpowered DBR4 struggled against the more advanced opposition. The best the car could achieve was 6th place finishes by Salvadori in British and Portuguese Grand Prix. For 1960 the lighter, independently sprung DBR5 was tried, but the sport had clearly moved on and front-engined Grand Prix cars, and Aston Martin cars were outclassed.

SeasonSeriesEvent
1959F1BRDC International Trophy
Driver No.Entrant
Roy Salvadori1David Brown Corporation
Scale ManufacturerCollection
1:43SMTS
Cat. No.QualityRarity
RL70
Factory built kit